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Freelance writing Blog Thesis Tips Tips to Write a Mesmerizing Thesis Statement in Half an Hour

18.12.14

5-characteristic-features-of-a-thesis-statement-review-of-academia-research

Tips to Write a Mesmerizing Thesis Statement in Half an Hour

Thesis statement is the cornerstone in the arch of your essay. As a matter of fact, the entire written assignment is based upon the argument that is the main claim made by the essay you develop in the body copy.

Any thesis must be consistent and strict-to-the point. As a rule, the key essay statement is given at the end of your introduction paragraph. It is presented by a sentence or two telling readers the main point of your essay. It shows that your paper is thoroughly researched, developed and backed up by applicable pieces of evidence.

Traditionally, students are advised to consider a thesis statement as an umbrella under which the rest of the essay contents fit.  2_5 characteristic features of a thesis statement review of academia research

5 characteristic features of a thesis statement

1. Delivers the main statement of your essay.
2. Informs the audience how exactly you’re going to develop the subject matter at hand.
3. Tells the audience how exactly the topic will be dwelled upon in the main body (also called an “essay roadmap”).
4. Provides a way to understand the topic under analysis.
5. Welcomes the readers to dig into reading the next chapter of your essay.

Before writing a thesis

Producing a solid thesis statement isn’t a thing done in a jiffy. A smart student spends hours of preparatory work to come finally up with a thesis idea that hits the target. Fetching a couple of variants of a thesis is a sign of you following into the right direction.

Before you think of a killer argument to base a key essay statement on, lots of preliminary activities take place. First and foremost, you have to read an assignment attentively and make sure you understand the topic at hand to the core.

Afterwards, the researching stage comes. Here you do your best to find out pieces of information relating to your topic that will be interesting for your readers to know. Finally, before presenting a winning thesis statement, you spend some time meditating on referential sources collected until a brilliant idea usually strikes you out of blue.

A self-check list to make sure your thesis statement gives gear academia research papers

A self-check list to make sure your thesis statement gives gear

So, you’ve picked a thesis that is the most preferable in your opinion. What comes next? You have to make sure the statement does live up to thesis standards in the academic world.

Am I answering a question in the task well enough? A thesis with an argument that is out of line with a question in the assignment has to be fixed.

Would readers like to challenge or oppose my thesis? A thesis statement that isn’t resonating with the audience might be a mere summary of a topic, not a claim.

Is my thesis specific enough? Vague milk-and-water statements have little chances to hook readers into reading your essay and engaging into any sort of discussion.

Does my thesis pass “So what?”, “Why?”, and “How?” tests? In case the answer is positive, you managed to connect the dots relating your statement to the body copy and conclusions.

Writing a thesis that leaves your readers captivated and restless until they read your essay till the very end is a small miracle, yet it can be mastered far quicker than you think. A good student can prepare a finely crafted and bullet-proof thesis under half an hour with a bit of subsequent polishing needed on the proofreading page.  Are you up for the challenge? Go for it!

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How to Write a Thesis Statement

How to Write a Thesis Statement

What is a Thesis Statement?

Almost all of us—even if we don’t do it consciously—look early in an essay for a one- or two-sentence condensation of the argument or analysis that is to follow. We refer to that condensation as a thesis statement.

Why Should Your Essay Contain a Thesis Statement?

  • to test your ideas by distilling them into a sentence or two
  • to better organize and develop your argument
  • to provide your reader with a “guide” to your argument

In general, your thesis statement will accomplish these goals if you think of the thesis as the answer to the question your paper explores.

How Can You Write a Good Thesis Statement?

Here are some helpful hints to get you started. You can either scroll down or select a link to a specific topic.

How to Generate a Thesis Statement if the Topic is Assigned
How to Generate a Thesis Statement if the Topic is not Assigned
How to Tell a Strong Thesis Statement from a Weak One


How to Generate a Thesis Statement if the Topic is Assigned

Almost all assignments, no matter how complicated, can be reduced to a single question. Your first step, then, is to distill the assignment into a specific question. For example, if your assignment is, “Write a report to the local school board explaining the potential benefits of using computers in a fourth-grade class,” turn the request into a question like, “What are the potential benefits of using computers in a fourth-grade class?” After you’ve chosen the question your essay will answer, compose one or two complete sentences answering that question.

Q: “What are the potential benefits of using computers in a fourth-grade class?”

A: “The potential benefits of using computers in a fourth-grade class are . . .”

OR

A: “Using computers in a fourth-grade class promises to improve . . .”

The answer to the question is the thesis statement for the essay.

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How to Generate a Thesis Statement if the Topic is not Assigned

Even if your assignment doesn’t ask a specific question, your thesis statement still needs to answer a question about the issue you’d like to explore. In this situation, your job is to figure out what question you’d like to write about.

A good thesis statement will usually include the following four attributes:

  • take on a subject upon which reasonable people could disagree
  • deal with a subject that can be adequately treated given the nature of the assignment
  • express one main idea
  • assert your conclusions about a subject

Let’s see how to generate a thesis statement for a social policy paper.

Brainstorm the topic.
Let’s say that your class focuses upon the problems posed by changes in the dietary habits of Americans. You find that you are interested in the amount of sugar Americans consume.

You start out with a thesis statement like this:

Sugar consumption.

This fragment isn’t a thesis statement. Instead, it simply indicates a general subject. Furthermore, your reader doesn’t know what you want to say about sugar consumption.

Narrow the topic.
Your readings about the topic, however, have led you to the conclusion that elementary school children are consuming far more sugar than is healthy.

You change your thesis to look like this:

Reducing sugar consumption by elementary school children.

This fragment not only announces your subject, but it focuses on one segment of the population: elementary school children. Furthermore, it raises a subject upon which reasonable people could disagree, because while most people might agree that children consume more sugar than they used to, not everyone would agree on what should be done or who should do it. You should note that this fragment is not a thesis statement because your reader doesn’t know your conclusions on the topic.

Take a position on the topic.
After reflecting on the topic a little while longer, you decide that what you really want to say about this topic is that something should be done to reduce the amount of sugar these children consume.

You revise your thesis statement to look like this:

More attention should be paid to the food and beverage choices available to elementary school children.

This statement asserts your position, but the terms more attention and food and beverage choices are vague.

Use specific language.
You decide to explain what you mean about food and beverage choices, so you write:

Experts estimate that half of elementary school children consume nine times the recommended daily allowance of sugar.

This statement is specific, but it isn’t a thesis. It merely reports a statistic instead of making an assertion.

Make an assertion based on clearly stated support.
You finally revise your thesis statement one more time to look like this:

Because half of all American elementary school children consume nine times the recommended daily allowance of sugar, schools should be required to replace the beverages in soda machines with healthy alternatives.

Notice how the thesis answers the question, “What should be done to reduce sugar consumption by children, and who should do it?” When you started thinking about the paper, you may not have had a specific question in mind, but as you became more involved in the topic, your ideas became more specific. Your thesis changed to reflect your new insights.

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How to Tell a Strong Thesis Statement from a Weak One

1. A strong thesis statement takes some sort of stand.

Remember that your thesis needs to show your conclusions about a subject. For example, if you are writing a paper for a class on fitness, you might be asked to choose a popular weight-loss product to evaluate. Here are two thesis statements:

There are some negative and positive aspects to the Banana Herb Tea Supplement.

This is a weak thesis statement. First, it fails to take a stand. Second, the phrase negative and positive aspects is vague.

Because Banana Herb Tea Supplement promotes rapid weight loss that results in the loss of muscle and lean body mass, it poses a potential danger to customers.

This is a strong thesis because it takes a stand, and because it’s specific.

2. A strong thesis statement justifies discussion.

Your thesis should indicate the point of the discussion. If your assignment is to write a paper on kinship systems, using your own family as an example, you might come up with either of these two thesis statements:

My family is an extended family.

This is a weak thesis because it merely states an observation. Your reader won’t be able to tell the point of the statement, and will probably stop reading.

While most American families would view consanguineal marriage as a threat to the nuclear family structure, many Iranian families, like my own, believe that these marriages help reinforce kinship ties in an extended family.

This is a strong thesis because it shows how your experience contradicts a widely-accepted view. A good strategy for creating a strong thesis is to show that the topic is controversial. Readers will be interested in reading the rest of the essay to see how you support your point.

3. A strong thesis statement expresses one main idea.

Readers need to be able to see that your paper has one main point. If your thesis statement expresses more than one idea, then you might confuse your readers about the subject of your paper. For example:

Companies need to exploit the marketing potential of the Internet, and Web pages can provide both advertising and customer support.

This is a weak thesis statement because the reader can’t decide whether the paper is about marketing on the Internet or Web pages. To revise the thesis, the relationship between the two ideas needs to become more clear. One way to revise the thesis would be to write:

Because the Internet is filled with tremendous marketing potential, companies should exploit this potential by using Web pages that offer both advertising and customer support.

This is a strong thesis because it shows that the two ideas are related. Hint: a great many clear and engaging thesis statements contain words like because, since, so, although, unless, and however.

4. A strong thesis statement is specific.

A thesis statement should show exactly what your paper will be about, and will help you keep your paper to a manageable topic. For example, if you’re writing a seven-to-ten page paper on hunger, you might say:

World hunger has many causes and effects.

This is a weak thesis statement for two major reasons. First, world hunger can’t be discussed thoroughly in seven to ten pages. Second, many causes and effects is vague. You should be able to identify specific causes and effects. A revised thesis might look like this:

Hunger persists in Glandelinia because jobs are scarce and farming in the infertile soil is rarely profitable.

This is a strong thesis statement because it narrows the subject to a more specific and manageable topic, and it also identifies the specific causes for the existence of hunger.

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